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A disappearing trade: Shrimping in St. Augustine

October 3, 2013 8:14 pm by: Category: Features, News, Top Stories Leave a comment A+ / A-

a photo essay by Sarah Williamson | gargoyle@flagler.edu


There is something almost prehistoric about the leathery skin of a shrimp fisherman, casting his net and cruising through St. Augustine’s waters.

It’s an ancient act. People have been harvesting shrimp off of Florida’s northeast coast for over 2,000 years. The industry was at its peak in St. Augustine during the early 1920’s.

Today, shrimping life is uncertain with an increase in fishing regulations, soaring oil prices and a huge decline in the national market. In fact, most of the shrimp you find frozen in a grocery store aisle is from Thailand, Vietnam and South America— the majority farm-raised.

“They’re gonna run us outta here. Soon, it’ll all be condos,” said Rudy Coleman, who has worked at the Seafood Shoppe for 13 years.

We must remember these weather-beaten hands, while fishermen are still our neighbors. While we can still sit and listen to their tales.

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A disappearing trade: Shrimping in St. Augustine Reviewed by on . a photo essay by Sarah Williamson | gargoyle@flagler.edu There is something almost prehistoric about the leathery skin of a shrimp fisherman, casting his net an a photo essay by Sarah Williamson | gargoyle@flagler.edu There is something almost prehistoric about the leathery skin of a shrimp fisherman, casting his net an Rating: 0

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